Tell Congress: Draw up articles of impeachment against Trump

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We have reached this point already - articles of impeachment need to be drawn up against President Donald Trump. And this process will need to be expedited even more quickly if Trump fires special prosecutor Mueller, as it's now clear he tried to do in June of 2017 and again in December 2017.

Trump has brought us to the brink of nuclear war, obstructed justice at the FBI and Department of Justice, threatened to shut down news organizations for reporting the truth, and — in a direct violation of the Constitution — taken money from foreign governments.

His comments in support of pro-Nazi demonstrators, derogatory descriptions of immigrants, and bigoted family separation policy are disgusting and provide a window into the racism that motivates his divisive rhetoric and agenda.

His former lawyer has now pleaded guilty and implicated him in multiple federal crimes — to which Trump amazingly confessed to on national TV.

And in court filings on December 7th, 2018 federal prosecutors concluded that Trump participated in these federal crimes when he directed Cohen to commit campaign finance violations by paying off two women during his 2016 campaign. The assertion marks the first time that federal prosecutors have deemed Trump an active participant in the conspiracy. Any other citizen not the president would have been already indicted by now.

But perhaps most jarring is Trump’s obvious status as being compromised by Vladimir Putin, which was clearly evidenced in his July 2018 press conference where he sided with the murderous Russian dictator over our own intelligence agencies.

His subservience to Putin becomes more understandable though when you realize Trump knew in advance about the June 2016 Trump Tower treason meeting, making him — at the very least — an accessory after the fact to a vast criminal conspiracy against the United States. And it’s now clear he was pursuing a Trump Tower Moscow deal, including a penthouse for the Russian dictator, well into the 2016 campaign.

All of this sounds crazy until you realize the FBI and law enforcement were thinking the exact same thing when they opened an inquiry into whether Trump was a Russian asset.

So, what action should be taken? There are actually a number of paths - and they should all be pursued.

First, Rep. Steve Cohen (D - TN) introduced five articles of impeachment against Trump.

The five articles accused the president of obstruction of justice related to the FBI investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, undermining the independence of the federal judiciary and other offenses. The obstruction of justice allegation stems from Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey, which the lawmakers say was designed to delay and impede an investigation. The articles of impeachment also charge that Trump has accepted without the consent of Congress emoluments from foreign states and from the U.S. government.

Secondly, Rep. Brad Sherman’s articles of impeachment also accuse Trump of obstructing justice by firing former FBI Director James B. Comey, among other wrongdoing. Congressman Sherman re-introduced his measure on January 3rd, 2019 in the new Congress.

Thirdly, members of the House should support Rep. Jamie Raskin's bill - and Rep. Zoe Lofgren's resolution - that would create an 11-member bipartisan commission known as the Oversight Commission on Presidential Capacity, which would medically examine the president and evaluate his mental and physical faculties before deciding upon his removal under the 25th Amendment.

With that process in motion, then the details can be argued about within the House of Representatives about which additional articles of impeachment to pursue against Trump, but there are a number of potential charges and criminal infractions from which members of Congress can choose.

See the full list here and below:

- Since the moment he was sworn in January 20th, 2017, Trump has repeatedly violated the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution by using the office of the presidency to receive compensation and gifts from foreign governments and agents.

- According to a May 2017 New York Times article, Trump was aware that Michael Flynn was under investigation and working as a foreign agent when they hired him in January 2017 to be National Security Advisor, granting him access to our nation's most highly classified secrets.

- In January 2018, NBC News reported that Flynn never told anyone about his January 24, 2017 meeting with the FBI in which he lied to investigators about whether or not he discussed Russian sanctions with Ambassador Kislyak. Trump and his team became aware of this fact two days later on January 26 when former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates informed the White House Counsel Don McGahn of this fact. It was the next day that Trump invited then-FBI Director Comey to the White House for dinner and asked for a loyalty pledge - and even more inexplicable was that Flynn was allowed to remain in his post for 18 more days.

- Comey wrote a memo in February 2017, later confirmed in his public testimony June 8th 2017, saying Trump cleared the room of witnesses and then asked him to shut down an investigation into Flynn. This is clearly obstruction of justice.

- In March 2017, Trump asked both the Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers to end the Trump-Russia investigation. In the incident March 22nd with Coats, Trump again asked everyone to clear the room - except CIA Director Pompeo - before making his illegal request. This is clearly obstruction of justice.

- According to a January 2018 New York Times article, in March 2017 Trump ordered McGahn to try to stop Attorney General Jeff Sessions from recusing himself from the Justice Department investigation into collusion. When this effort failed, Trump raged, saying Sessions should be protecting him from the probe, and asking: “Where’s my Roy Cohn?”

- Again in March 2017, Trump angrily berated Sessions for recusing himself from the investigation and demanded he reverse his decision. Sessions refused, but this is further evidence of Trump's criminal intent to commit obstruction of justice.

- On March 30th, 2017, according to Comey’s Senate testimony, Trump calls Comey at his office and tells Comey that the Russia investigation is a “cloud” inhibiting his ability to act as president. Trump assures Comey that he has had nothing to do with Russia and asks Comey what he can do to “lift the cloud.”

- Trump sent text messages to Flynn - including one that said "stay strong" - as late as April 2017 in an attempt to influence his possible testimony and prevent him from cooperating with authorities. This is witness tampering.

- On April 11th, 2017, according to Comey’s Senate testimony, Trump calls Comey again and asks what he has done about Trump’s request to publicize the fact that he is not personally under investigation. Comey tells Trump that he relayed Trump’s request to Acting Deputy AG Dana Boente but that he has not heard back. Trump reiterates that the “cloud” is interfering with his ability to act as president, and asks whether he should have his staff contact Boente. Comey advises Trump of the traditional channel, which is for White House Counsel to contact DOJ leadership to make such requests. Trump says he will do so and tells Comey, “Because I have been very loyal to you, very loyal; we had that thing you know.” Comey responds by reiterating that the proper channel for Trump’s request is for Trump to follow the DOJ chain of command.

- Trump tried to intimidate Yates by accusing her via Twitter of leaking classified information just hours before her testimony before Congress May 8th, 2017. This is also witness tampering and intimidation.

- Trump fired Comey May 9th, 2017 and admitted - both on national TV to NBC's Lester Holt May 11th and to the Russians in the Oval Office on May 10th - that it was to stop the Trump-Russia investigation. This is clearly obstruction of justice.

- According to a January 2018 New York Times article, the letter that Trump originally drafted firing Comey in May 2017 — whose release was blocked by his advisers — contained an explicit reference to the Russia probe in the first sentence, according to the Times’s sources. The White House had previously told the Times that the letter didn’t mention the Russia probe.

- Trump divulged highly classified intelligence information to high-ranking Russian officials in the Oval Office May 10th 2017. This is mishandling of classified material. On April 29th 2017, Trump also told the President of the Philippines sensitive classified information about the location of our nuclear submarines.

- Trump threatened Comey via Twitter. May 12th, 2017 to not discuss their earlier meetings together and insinuated he had tape recordings of their conversations. Trump then bragged about influencing Comey's testimony during an interview that aired June 23rd on 'Fox and Friends.' This is again witness tampering and intimidation.

- According to a September 2017 New York Times article, on May 17th, of that year, shortly after hearing that the Justice Department had appointed Mueller to take over the Russia investigation, Trump berated Sessions. The appointment had caused the administration again to lose control over the investigation, and Trump accused Sessions of “disloyalty.” This is more evidence of obstruction of justice.

- In June 2017, according to a January 2018 New York Times report, Trump ordered McGahn to fire Mueller, but McGahn threatened to quit. This would have been obstruction of justice had the firing occur, but it shows Trump's intent to obstruct.

- Trump personally dictated a statement he knew to be false on July 8, 2017 regarding his son’s infamous June 2016 Trump Tower meeting to discuss collusion opportunities with Kremlin-connected operatives. This is clearly obstruction of justice and places the President directly in the middle of a Trump-Russia cover-up. We later learned Trump knew of the June 2016 Trump Tower treason meeting in advance and he also later admitted the purpose of the meeting, which makes him — at the very least — an accessory after the fact of a vast criminal conspiracy against the United States and further strengthens the obstruction charges against him given the Air Force One statement.

- Just hours after FBI agents conducted a July 26th pre-dawn raid of his campaign manager Paul Manafort’s house, Trump was urging Sessions to dismiss the acting Director of the FBI Andrew McCabe via Twitter. This is potentially obstruction of justice.

- The New York Times reported in March 2018 that Trump and his lawyers discussed pardoning Flynn and Manafort in the summer of 2017. The discussions came as the special counsel was building cases against both men, and they raise questions about whether the lawyer, John Dowd, who has since resigned, was offering pardons to influence their decisions about whether to plead guilty and cooperate in the investigation. This is clearly a conspiracy to commit witness tampering and obstruction of justice.

- On August 7th, Trump called Sen. Thom Tillis to let him know he was unhappy with legislation that would potentially prevent him from firing special counsel Mueller in order to end the Trump-Russia investigation. This was another effort at obstruction of justice by the President.

- On August 9th, Trump called Mitch McConnell and began to yell at him about his failure to "protect him" from the Russia investigation. Yet another piece of evidence in this long and public effort to obstruct justice in a federal investigation.

- In October 2017, Trump suggested NBC News have their license to broadcast news revoked because they aired stories he did not like, despite all evidence that they were true. This is a clear violation of the First Amendment to our Constitution.

- On November 3rd 2017, Trump sent a series of tweets and made numerous statements which attempted to turn the immense power of the Justice Department and federal criminal investigative agencies against his political adversaries - exactly the same activity that Congress was ready to impeach Richard Nixon for in 1973.

- A November 30th 2017, a New York Times story detailed numerous accounts from U.S. Senators of Trump calling them and asking them to finish or end their Trump-Russia investigations. This is again part of a pattern of obstruction of justice.

- On December 2nd 2017, Trump tweeted “I had to fire General Flynn because he lied to the Vice President and the FBI.” This is an admission of obstruction of justice because it shows he was trying to end the investigation into Flynn and knew Flynn had lied to the FBI when he began asking Comey for loyalty.

- According to an April 2018 New York Times article, Trump wanted to fire Mueller again in December 2017, but was talked down by his lawyers. This again shows his intent and desire to obstruct justice and that he has the mindset to obstruct justice.

- On December 23rd 2017, Trump repeatedly attacked McCabe on Twitter in an effort to intimidate him and retaliate for recent closed door testimony in which McCabe verified Comey's account that Trump demanded a loyalty pledge before firing him. This is again witness tampering and an attempt to obstruct justice.

- According to a March 7, 2018 New York Times article, Trump has been talking to White House staffers about what they told Mueller in their interviews. This is possible witness tampering and further exemplifies Trump's consciousness of guilt. The article also describes a conversation in which Trump asked McGahn to put out a statement saying Trump did not ask him to fire Mueller, which of course Trump did ask him to fire Mueller in June 2017.

- Throughout, Trump (and this quotation comes from the Nixon article of impeachment) “made false or misleading public statements for the purpose of deceiving the people of the United States.” Among other things, Trump repeatedly made untruthful statements about American intelligence agencies’ conclusions regarding Russia’s role in the 2016 election.

- Comey told three top FBI officials about conversations he had with President Donald Trump before he was fired last May. On March 17, 2018, Trump fired Andrew McCabe, which means all three officials - McCabe, James Rybicki, and James Baker - have since been forced out of the bureau, or reassigned within it.

- On April 5th, 2018, aboard Air Force One, Trump lied to reporters and the American people when he said he did not know about the $130,000 payment to porn star Stormy Daniels to purchase her silence about their sexual affair. However, his lawyer Rudy Giuliani then said on May 2nd that Trump did indeed reimburse his lawyer Michael Cohen for the $130,000 and thus obviously knew about the payment.

- Trump then confirmed he reimbursed Cohen in a May 3rd tweet and then this information was confirmed again in the May 16th financial disclosure forms that were released.

- Trump then lied again in August 2018 about when he learned about these payments when he contradicted an audiotaped conversation with Cohen.

- A November 9th, 2018 article from the Wall Street Journal laid out these lies again by showing how federal prosecutors have gathered evidence of Trump’s direct participation in transactions that violated campaign-finance laws, specifically the large payments to Daniels and McDougal. In this entire deplorable episode, Trump has lied to the press, to the American people, and by not initially reporting the hush money payment, he has broken campaign finance laws.

- And finally in this saga of hush money payments, in a court filing on December 7th, 2018 we learned that Trump directed Michael Cohen to make the illegal hush money payments and then in a subsequent filing on December 12th we learned that AMI — the parent company for the National Enquirer — admitted that it made the hush money payment to McDougal in concert with the Trump campaign and for the purposes of influencing the election. And on December 13th we learned that Trump was in the room to discuss this conspiracy in August 2015.

- A November 20, 2018 New York Times article revealed Trump urged the Justice Department in April of 2018 to prosecute Hillary Clinton and James Comey. This is blatant obstruction of justice, as Comey would be a witness against the president and this type of behavior is exactly what drove articles of impeachment against Nixon — using the levers of government to punish your political enemies.

- In May of 2018, Trump violated the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution by making a deal with the Chinese government to help the telecom giant ZTE in exchange for loans to fund a construction project that benefits his business.

- According to a May 2018 Washington Post article, Trump personally pushed U.S. Postmaster General Megan Brennan to double the rate the Postal Service charges Amazon.com to ship packages, a dramatic move that probably would cost the company billions of dollars - and a clear case of Trump using government agencies to punish his very public enemy, Jeff Bezos. Articles of impeachment were drawn up against President Nixon for using the IRS to punish his enemies and this is no different.

- In April 2018, Trump installed a policy of family separation for immigrant refugees seeking asylum in which children as young as three months old were torn from their mothers and older kids were forced to live in cages. Trump then lied repeatedly to the press and the American people that there was nothing he could do to stop the policy and even suggested we eliminate due process rights for anyone illegally entering our country. This is a clear violation of the U.S. Constitution and his actions brought condemnation from the United Nations Human Rights council.

- According to Politico, President Trump told a group of wealthy supporters in May 2018 about a battle in Syria that saw the U.S. military kill between 100 and 300 Russians, despite the fact that details of that battle are classified. This is yet another instance of Trump mishandling classified information.

- On July 16, 2018, Trump stood on foreign soil next to Vladimir Putin and agreed with the Russian dictator’s assessment that Russia did not meddle in the 2016 election, ignoring the conclusions of his own intelligence services, a bi-partisan Senate Intelligence panel, and the special prosecutor’s findings. He literally chose the side of our enemy against his own people and by refusing to acknowledge that Russia meddled in our elections, he has also chosen not to protect us against all threats, foreign and domestic — a clear violation of the oath he swore on January 20, 2017. For these reasons, Trump should be impeached.


- Adding another piece of evidence to Mueller’s case of obstruction of justice against the president, Trump on August 1st, 2018 overtly and publicly called on Sessions to end the special counsel investigation and “stop this Rigged Witch Hunt right now.”

- Over a few days in August 2018, Trump, once again, repeatedly attacked his own Attorney General and demanded he shut down the Mueller investigation. This is another example of obstruction of justice in plain sight to all.

- On August 14, 2018, former senior White House advisor Omarosa Manigault-Newman said Trump knew about the infamous 2016 hacked emails before Wikileaks released them — which, if true, would make Trump, at the very least, an accessory after the fact to a conspiracy to defraud the United States and greatly strengthen the case regarding Trump-Russia collusion.

- On Thursday, August 16th — in a clear abuse of presidential power — Trump revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan and then linked his decision to do so to the Trump-Russia investigation. This is further evidence of obstruction of justice — and it’s worth noting that articles of impeachment were drawn up against Nixon because he used the levers of government power to punish his political enemies.

- On August 20th, 2018, Trump lashed out and attacked Mueller on Twitter in yet another attempt to thwart the Trump-Russia investigation. This is another example of Trump’s intent to obstruct justice.

- On August 21st, 2018, Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to tax fraud, bank fraud, and campaign finance violations and said that Trump directed him to pay women to stay silent about damaging stories during the 2016 presidential campaign. This directly implicates Trump in a crime and places in doubt the very integrity of his election as president.

- The following day on August 22nd, Trump further implicated himself by insisting he is in the clear because the payments “weren’t taken out of campaign finance. They didn’t come out of the campaign, they came from me.” That is not a defense. That is why it’s a crime. If the money came from the campaign, it would have been legal. The president just admitted to a crime — again — on national TV.

- In the same August 22nd interview, Trump again lied, saying he learned of the hush money payments “later on,” but that’s clearly not true because we hear him on tape discussing the payments with Michael Cohen BEFORE the payments were even made. This is the president again lying about his participation in a federal crime.

- In late August, Trump once again took to Twitter to slam his own Attorney General, urging him to both end the Russia investigation, investigate his political opponents, and to even question his manhood. This is more obstruction of justice and abuse of power. You can see a list of all his attacks on Sessions here.

- At a rally in Evansville, Indiana in late August 2018, Trump again lashed out at the FBI and DOJ and threatened to get involved and end their investigations into his corruption. This is more obvious examples of abuse of power and obstruction of justice.

- A new report in August 2018 commissioned by the government of Puerto Rico raised the death toll from Hurricane Maria to nearly 3,000 and many local government officials directly pinned blame for that new total on the Trump administration’s incompetent and neglectful response to the disaster. Trump’s lack of effort to protect American citizens is an impeachable offense.

- On Labor Day 2018, Trump again took to Twitter to attack his own Attorney General, this time urging him to end corruption investigations into two Republican members of Congress because it would help the GOP politically. This is again obstruction of justice and a blatant abuse of power.

- In the wake of the September 5th, 2018 publishing of an anonymous New York Times op-ed by a senior member of the administration, Trump went into a rage and called for Sessions and the Justice Department to investigate the matter and the newspaper. This is again an abuse of power and misuse of government resources for partisan political purposes.

- On September 17th, 2018, Trump cherry-picked documents and then had them declassified in order to interfere once again in the treason investigation he is facing and to target his political enemies. This is a clear abuse of power, an obvious obstruction of justice, and reminiscent of the actions of a banana republic dictator.

- On September 19th, 2018, Trump again attacked Sessions over his refusal to use his position as Attorney General to thwart the Trump-Russia treason investigation. He went as far as to declare “I don’t have an Attorney General.” This is one more example of obstruction of justice in plain view for all to see.

- On October 16, 2018, after a phone call with Saudi Arabia’s King Salman, Trump floated a completely unsubstantiated claim that “rogue killers” may be responsible for journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s death. This was an obvious attempt to obstruct justice in the probe of the killings and an attempt to do the bidding of a foreign power due to his personal business interests. This is precisely what the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution was designed to prevent.

- On November 7th, 2018, Trump fired Sessions in order replace him with a partisan who is openly hostile to Mueller and his treason investigation. This is obviously obstruction of justice and could lead next to the dismissal of Mueller or Rosenstein and the use of various techniques to thwart the probe.

- On November 28, 2018 Trump openly contemplated a pardon for his former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, which is a clear attempt to obstruct justice — and it’s exactly what Nixon was accused of doing when articles of impeachment were drawn up against him.

- On November 30, 2018, Cohen pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about the Trump Tower Moscow deal. This is very bad for Trump. Cohen says he aimed to secure a lucrative business deal with Russians closely linked with Putin on Trump’s behalf during the 2016 presidential election — all while Trump was repeatedly championing better Washington-Moscow ties in campaign speeches. What’s worse, it’s entirely possible Trump knew a close confidant willingly lied to Congress.

- On December 3rd, 2018, Trump committed obstruction of justice and witness tampering on Twitter. Trump’s first statement went after Cohen. In his tweet, Trump alleged that Cohen lied to Mueller and called for a severe penalty, demanding that his former fixer “serve a full and complete sentence.” After the overt attack on Cohen came a tweet encouraging Roger Stone, a longtime adviser to Trump, not to become a witness against him.

- In court filings on December 7th, 2018 federal prosecutors concluded that Trump participated in federal crimes when he directed Cohen to commit campaign finance violations by paying off two women during his 2016 campaign. The assertion marks the first time that federal prosecutors have deemed Trump an active participant in the conspiracy. Any other citizen not the president would have been already indicted by now.

- On December 12th, 2018, a public disclosure of the non-prosecution agreement between federal prosecutors and AMI — the parent company to the National Enquirer — which admitted that it made its $150,000 payment “in concert with” the Trump presidential campaign, in order to ensure that McDougal did not make public her damaging allegations about Trump before the 2016 presidential election. This means that the federal prosecutors now have corroboration of Cohen’s testimony against Trump from a second reliable source, which along with the trail of documents following the money from Trump through a complex web of companies designed to hide the payments. It also gives Congress a neatly wrapped Christmas present labeled “Article I of the Impeachment of Donald J. Trump.”

- On December 13th, 2018, we learned that Trump was the third person in the room in August 2015 when Cohen and National Enquirer publisher David Pecker discussed ways Pecker could help counter negative stories about Trump’s relationships with women. This places the president as a knowing participant in a criminal scheme to defraud the voters and break campaign finance law — and exposes even more lies that have been told by Trump.

- On December 14th, 2018, we learned that Manafort advised administration officials in the spring and summer of 2017 on how to politically undermine the FBI and Mueller investigation in three main ways. He also gave them advice on how some of the witnesses against both him and the president might be discredited. In short, Manafort and Trump were working together to discredit the investigators as well as potential witnesses all while Trump was repeatedly dangling a pardon in front of Manafort— this is blatant obstruction of justice and more witness tampering by Trump.

- On December 13th, 2018 we also learned that a federal investigation into Trump’s long-suspected inaugural fundraising violations was underway. The probe is examining whether some of the committee’s top donors gave money in exchange for access, policy concessions or to influence administration positions. There are indications the president’s children are involved — Ivanka was allegedly charging obscene rates at the family hotel — and possibly illegal foreign donations were made using straw donors. Trump’s involvement is unknown at this time, but is highly unlikely he was not at least aware of the violations as they occurred. Stay tuned.

- On December 18th, 2018, the New York AG Barbara Underwood announced she was dissolving the Trump Foundation and that an investigation found “a shocking pattern of illegality involving the foundation — including unlawful coordination with the Trump presidential campaign, repeated and willful self-dealing, and much more.” At the very least, this investigation has revealed additional campaign finance violations, furthering the fraud that Trump perpetrated on American voters during the campaign.

- On December 18th, 2018, we learned Trump did indeed sign a letter of intent to build a Trump Tower in Moscow, despite Giuliani denying that he did and despite Trump repeatedly telling the public during the 2016 presidential campaign that he had “nothing to do with Russia.” It’s one more lie and it further explains why Trump was and is so subservient to Putin — the Russian dictator has known he was lying about this issue for years.

- On December 21st, 2018, we learned Trump lashed out at his self-appointed acting AG Matt Whitaker over investigations being carried out in New York that have implicated the president, “Individual One”, in crimes. This is completely inappropriate and it’s another example of Trump obstructing justice in that it puts pressure on Whitaker to stop the investigations.

- On January 13th, 2019 it was reported that Trump has concealed from top officials the contents of his five personal one-on-one meetings with Vladimir Putin and in one instance even confiscated an interpreters notes from a meeting. If true, this violates the Presidential Records Act of 1978 and further grows the body of evidence that Trump is under the influence of Russia.

Tell your members of Congress now to begin the process of impeaching Donald Trump.