Did the FCC invent a fake DDoS attack to cover up the fact that they lost comments from net neutrality supporters?

FCC Chief Information Officer David Bray

Fcc-building-photo-courtesy-of-the-fcc

The FCC is claiming that a cyber attack took down their site this week *at the exact same time* that a massive flood of people were trying to comment in support of net neutrality, following John Oliver's viral segment on Last Week Tonight.

The agency has offered zero evidence of this alleged DDoS attack, and has even claimed that the same exact thing happened during John Oliver's last segment on the issue in 2014.

The FCC's servers have crashed multiple times under the weight of massive public feedback when they have tried to take away the free speech protections that keep the Internet awesome. In fact, the servers went down again on Monday night around the same time that the John Oliver segment re-aired on HBO.

It seems likely that this alleged DDoS attack is their way of covering up the fact that they never actually fixed their website so that it could handle the large volume of comments from supporters of net neutrality. If indeed their site was attacked, it seems likely it was by anti-net neutrality actor trying to prevent the flood of legitimate comments resulting from the John Oliver video.

Either way, the public deserves to know what is really going on. This issue affects all of us.

Sign the petition to tell the FCC: "As a supporter of Title II based net neutrality protections, I am very concerned about the FCC's recent claims that it experienced a DDoS attack at a time when many people would have been attempting to comment. You can't continue making these claims about strangely timed DDoS attacks without proof. Release your logs to an independent security researcher or major media outlet who can verify your claims and inform the public about what really happened."

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To: FCC Chief Information Officer David Bray
From: [Your Name]

"As a supporter of Title II based net neutrality protections, I am very concerned about the FCC's recent claims that it experienced a DDoS attack at a time when many people would have been attempting to comment. You can't continue making these claims about strangely timed DDoS attacks without proof. Release your logs to an independent security researcher or major media outlet who can verify your claims and inform the public about what really happened."