Right to Counsel for Evictions In Connecticut / Derecho a un abogado para desalojos en Connecticut

Connecticut Co-Chairs of Housing and Judiciary Committees / Los copresidentes del comité judicial y el comité de vivienda de Connecticut

Rtc-fbook

La traducción al español está abajo / Spanish translation is below

We are tenants, working people, students, families, couples and individuals, old and young, black, brown, indigenous, and white, abled and disabled, documented and undocumented,  living across Connecticut, and calling upon our elected representatives to propose and pass Right to Counsel legislation guaranteeing the right to no-cost legal counsel to all tenants facing eviction proceedings in the 2021 legislative session.


Right to counsel legislation represents a meaningful step towards combating mass evictions and housing instability. Data shows that outcomes for low-income tenants in eviction cases improves dramatically with representation. Across the country, cities from New York to Boulder have already implemented right to counsel legislation. These cities have seen real results: up to a 77% reduction in evictions, with more tenants winning the fight to stay in their homes.

Evictions are now, more than ever, a matter of life and death. We are calling on you to combat mass evictions and pass Right to Counsel legislation to:

  • Establish access to an attorney as a right in eviction cases
  • Guarantee legal representation by not-for-profit legal service providers with expertise in housing law
  • Universally cover all residential tenants in all types of rental housing
  • Cover all evictions and all eviction-related cases, including administrative hearings
  • Fund for attorney training and support
  • Fund for tenant organizing, advocacy, and leadership development
  • Establish affirmative litigation to enforce tenant rights

/

Somos inquilinos, gente trabajadora, estudiantes, familias, parejas e individuos, viejos y jóvenes, negros, marrones, indígenas, y blancos, capacitados y discapacitados, documentados e indocumentados, viviendo en Connecticut, y les pedimos a nuestros representantes a que propongan y pasen la legislación para el Derecho a un Abogado la cual garantiza el derecho a un abogado sin costo a todos los inquilinos que estén enfrentando un desalojo, en la sesión legislativa de 2021.

La legislación para el Derecho a un Abogado es un paso significativo para combatir contra los desalojos masivos y la inestabilidad de vivienda. Por todo el país, ciudades desde Nueva York hasta Boulder ya han implementado legislación para el derecho a un abogado. Estas ciudades han visto resultados exitosos: una reducción de desalojos por un 77%, con más inquilinos ganando la lucha para quedarse en sus hogares.

Los desalojos son ahora mismo, más que nunca, un asunto de vida o muerte. Les pedimos a ustedes que combatan los desalojos masivos y que pasen legislación para el Derecho a un Abogado para:


  • Establecer el acceso a un abogado como un derecho en juicios sobre desalojos

  • Garantizar la representación legal por proveedores de servicios legales sin fines de lucro con experiencia en leyes de vivienda

  • Cubrir universalmente a todos los inquilinos residenciales en todo tipo de alojamiento arrendado

  • Cubrir a todos los desalojos y juicios relacionados a desalojos, incluyendo audiencias de carácter administrativo

  • Establecer un fondo para el entrenamiento y apoyo de abogados

  • Establecer un fondo para la organización de inquilinos, apoyo, y desarrollo de liderazgo

  • Establecer litigación afirmativa para hacer cumplir los derechos de los inquilinos

Endorsed by / Apoyado por:
Connecticut Fair Housing Center, Connecticut Legal Services, Connecticut AFL-CIO, Connecticut Chapter of the National Lawyers Guild, New Haven Legal Assistance Association, Greater Hartford Legal Aid, UNITE-HERE New England Joint Board, Make the Road CT, Working Families Party CT, Sunrise New Haven, Bridgeport Generation Now, Witnesses to Hunger New Haven, Hamden Action Now, New Britain Racial Justice Coalition, Western CT DSA, Quiet Corner DSA, Nonprofit Accountability Group, Black and Brown United in Action, New Haven Educators' Collective, National Coalition for a Civil Right to Counsel, Connecticut Legal Rights Project, PT Partners, Sunrise Connecticut, Black Lives Matter 860, Connecticut Drivers United, Connecticut Workers Crisis Response, Cancel Rent CT, Naugatuck Valley Young Democrats, Quinnipiac Law School Chapter of the National Lawyers Guild, El Pueblo Unido, Center for Latino Progress, Citizens Opposed to Police States, Connecticut Women's Education and Legal Fund, Power Up Williamantic, Green Party of CT , UConn Law chapter of the People’s Parity Project, Junta for Progressive Action, American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut, Unidad Latina en Acción - ULA, Connecticut Veterans Legal Center, Hamden Democratic Town Committee, Hamden Progressive Action Network, Middletown Mutual Aid Collective, Mothers and Others for Justice, Industrial Workers of the World-CT



If you're organization would like to endorse, please email us at housingjustice_cctdsa [AT] riseup.net


Sponsored by
Additional Sponsors

To: Connecticut Co-Chairs of Housing and Judiciary Committees / Los copresidentes del comité judicial y el comité de vivienda de Connecticut
From: [Your Name]

We are tenants, working people, students, families, couples and individuals, old and young, black, brown, indigenous, and white, abled and disabled, documented and undocumented, living across Connecticut, and calling upon our elected representatives to propose and pass Right to Counsel legislation guaranteeing the right to no-cost legal counsel to all tenants facing eviction proceedings in the 2021 legislative session.

In Connecticut, 80 percent of landlords have representation in eviction cases, while only 7 percent of tenants do. Navigating the complex and intimidating process of an eviction proceeding alone, tenants are set up to fail. Urban eviction rates in Connecticut—where one third of residents are renters—are some of the highest in the country. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated an already serious housing crisis in Connecticut, with an increasing number of tenants in the state putting over half of their income towards rent. In the months following the expiration of the eviction moratorium, nearly 40,000 tenants across the state are expected to face eviction, despite the fact that evictions are linked to higher rates of COVID-19 and death. Black and Latinx tenants will face disproportionate impacts of the impending eviction crisis, leading to: negative physical and mental health outcomes; disruptions in schooling and lower academic achievement; and reducing future access to safe, healthy, and affordable housing, as landlords routinely deny applications submitted by tenants who have eviction cases on their records.

We cannot adequately meet the problems posed by the housing crisis with short-term measures. The state and federal moratoriums on eviction serve only as temporary stop-gaps, and Governor Lamont has already allowed evictions to begin taking place. Since the governor’s limited moratorium took effect in April, landlords have filed complaints against over 1,800 families, and have received permission for marshals to move out over 500 families and their belongings out of their homes, according to court data tracked by the Connecticut Fair Housing Center.

Right to counsel legislation represents a meaningful step towards combating mass evictions and housing instability. Data shows that outcomes for low-income tenants in eviction cases improves dramatically with representation. Across the country, cities from New York to Boulder have already implemented right to counsel legislation. These cities have seen real results: up to a 77% reduction in evictions, with more tenants winning the fight to stay in their homes.

In a 2016 report, the Connecticut General Assembly’s Task Force to Improve Access to Legal Counsel in Civil Matters recommended full right to counsel for tenants in eviction proceedings to combat the devastating effects of eviction, homelessness, and prolonged housing instability. Four years later, the overwhelming majority of tenants still go without counsel when facing eviction. Connecticut’s tenants need justice in their eviction cases. It is time to take real steps to combat this crisis.

Evictions are now, more than ever, a matter of life and death. We are calling on you to combat mass evictions and pass Right to Counsel legislation to:

• Establish access to an attorney as a right in eviction cases
• Guarantee legal representation by not-for-profit legal service providers with expertise in housing law
• Universally cover all residential tenants in all types of rental housing
• Cover all evictions and all eviction-related cases, including administrative hearings
• Fund for attorney training and support
• Fund for tenant organizing, advocacy, and leadership development
• Establish affirmative litigation to enforce tenant rights

/

Somos inquilinos, gente trabajadora, estudiantes, familias, parejas e individuos, viejos y jóvenes, negros, marrones, indígenas, y blancos, capacitados y discapacitados, documentados e indocumentados, viviendo en Connecticut, y les pedimos a nuestros representantes a que propongan y pasen la legislación para el Derecho a un Abogado, la cual garantiza el derecho a un abogado sin costo a todos los inquilinos que estén enfrentando un desalojo, en la sesión legislativa de 2021.

En Connecticut, el 80% de propietarios cuentan con representación en los juicios de desalojo, mientras que solo el 7% de los inquilinos gozan de la misma ayuda. Al navegar el complejo e intimidante proceso de un procedimiento de desalojo solos, los inquilinos se encuentran en una posición muy vulnerable. La tasa de desalojo en zonas urbanas en Connecticut–donde una tercera parte de los residentes son inquilinos–es una de las más altas del país. La pandemia de COVID-19 ha exacerbado una ya seria crisis de vivienda en Connecticut, con un número creciente de inquilinos en el estado que destinan más de la mitad de su ingreso hacia su pago de renta. En los meses tras la expiración del moratorio de desalojos, se espera que enfrenten desalojos de casi 40.000 inquilinos por todo el estado, a pesar de que los desalojos están vinculados con tasas más altas de COVID-19 y muertes. Los inquilinos negros y Latinx serán desproporcionadamente impactados por la inminente crisis de desalojos, conduciendo a: consecuencias negativas de salud física y mental; perturbaciones en el ámbito de la educación y bajos rendimientos académicos; y la reducción de acceso a vivienda segura, saludable y asequible en el futuro, pues los terratenientes habitualmente niegan las aplicaciones de inquilinos que tienen casos de desalojamiento documentados.

No podemos adecuadamente resolver los problemas planteados por la crisis de vivienda con medidas de corto plazo. Los moratorios de desalojo estatales y federales sirven solo como soluciones provisionales, y el Gobernador Lamont ya ha permitido que reanuden los desalojos. Desde que el moratorio del gobernador tomó efecto en abril, los terratenientes han presentado quejas contra más de 1,800 familias, y han recibido permiso para que los mariscales expulsen a más de 500 familias y sus pertenencias de sus hogares, según la información de los procedimientos judiciales documentados por el Centro de Vivienda Justa de Connecticut (Connecticut Fair Housing Center).

La legislación para el Derecho a un Abogado es un paso significativo para combatir contra los desalojos masivos y la inestabilidad de vivienda. Por todo el país, ciudades desde Nueva York hasta Boulder ya han implementado legislación para el derecho a un abogado. Estas ciudades han visto resultados exitosos: una reducción de desalojos de hasta un 77%, con más inquilinos ganando la lucha para quedarse en sus hogares.

En un reporte del 2016, el Equipo de Trabajo para el Mejoramiento de Acceso a Abogados en Asuntos Civiles de la Asamblea General de Connecticut recomendó el derecho completo a un abogado para inquilinos en procedimientos de desalojo para combatir los efectos devastadores de los desalojos, el sinhogarismo, y la prolongada inestabilidad de viviendas. Cuatro años después, la inmensa mayoría de los inquilinos aún enfrentan casos de desalojo sin un abogado. Los inquilinos de Connecticut necesitan justicia en sus casos de desalojo. Es hora de tomar medidas reales para combatir esta crisis.

Los desalojos son ahora mismo, más que nunca, un asunto de vida o muerte. Les pedimos a ustedes que combatan los desalojos masivos y que pasen legislación para el Derecho a un Abogado para:

Establecer el acceso a un abogado como un derecho en juicios sobre desalojos
Garantizar la representación legal por proveedores de servicios legales sin fines de lucro con experiencia en leyes de vivienda
Cubrir universalmente a todos los inquilinos residenciales en todo tipo de alojamiento arrendado
Cubrir a todos los desalojos y juicios relacionados a desalojos, incluyendo audiencias de carácter administrativo
Fondo para el entrenamiento y apoyo de abogados
Establecer un Fondo para la organización de inquilinos, apoyo, y desarrollo de liderazgo
Establecer litigación afirmativa para hacer cumplir los derechos de los inquilinos