Support our kangaroos before it's too late...

Councillor Christian Dickson, Mayor Mark Jamieson, Professor Greg Hill, USC Sustainability Management Committee, Council of the University of the Sunshine Coast

Joe

The kangaroo population at the University of the Sunshine Coast and in the Sippy Downs area has declined rapidly since 2010.

We are calling on Members of Council and the University to urgently implement improved and more stringent management policies and procedures to reduce the number of kangaroo-vehicle collisions on Sippy Downs Drive, Claymore Road, Stringybark Road and on the USC campus roads.

In 2010, there were approximately 80 kangaroos on the USC campus but as of March 2017, there were less than 13 kangaroos left on the USC campus.

Sign the petition to conserve and support the kangaroo population at USC, our university icon.

Petition by
USC Environment Collective
Sippy Downs, Australia

To: Councillor Christian Dickson, Mayor Mark Jamieson, Professor Greg Hill, USC Sustainability Management Committee, Council of the University of the Sunshine Coast
From: [Your Name]

We would like to draw your attention to the plight of the kangaroo population at USC and in the Sippy Downs area which is declining rapidly. In 2010, there were approximately 80 kangaroos on the USC campus but as of March 2017, there were less than 13 kangaroos left on the USC campus.

We request that you take urgent action to conserve and support the remaining Sippy Downs kangaroo population. Specifically, we request that immediate action be taken in the form of improved and more stringent management policies and procedures to reduce the number of kangaroo-vehicle collisions by:

- reducing speed limits to 40 km/hour or less on Sippy Downs Drive, Claymore Road, and Stringybark Road

- implementing ongoing management of lower ground vegetation along roadsides to improve visibility of emerging kangaroos

- improving and increasing road signage throughout the area

The kangaroos are an icon for the university and the Sippy Downs area and we believe that they are worthy of conservation and your attention.

Regards