We Stand with Immigrant Families

President Trump, U.S. Attorney Jeff Sessions, U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Kristjen Nielsen, and the United States Congress

In the last few weeks, agents of the United States have separated thousands of children from their primary caregivers with no clear plans for reunification. A recent executive order overturned this policy but allows for children to be detained indefinitely with their parents. This is unacceptable. As Holocaust survivors and their descendants, we carry the solemn responsibility to ensure that the trauma and destruction visited on millions of people during the Holocaust because of their religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, citizenship, and political beliefs will never happen again.  We cannot allow silence in the face of inhumanity to become a part of our legacy.  

Whether your family was liberated from a concentration camp or fled before the war, the consequences of the trauma are far reaching. Add your name to the below letter and send a message: Never Again.  

The letter will be delivered, with the names of survivors and their families, to President Trump, U.S. Attorney Jeff Sessions, U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Kristjen Nielsen, Mitch McConnell, Paul Ryan, Chuck Schumer, and Nancy Pelosi.

Have photos of your family you'd like to add? Email them to picturesfromgrandpa@gmail.com.


The above image is the handwriting of a 5 year old girl, Salusia, who was murdered in Auschwitz.


Letter Text:


We, the undersigned, are Holocaust survivors, their children, their grandchildren, and their great-grandchildren. In the name of our family tragedies, we denounce the indefinite internment of children in detention centers under the zero-tolerance policy.  We ask elected and appointed officials to acknowledge the history and consequences of internment camps and enact immigration policies that recognizes the needs of asylum seekers and the rights of children.  

The zero-tolerance policy enacted by the current administration violates human rights under the auspices of immigration law. The United States is indefinitely detaining children and their parents seeking refuge. In 1939, almost 900 Jewish refugees were turned away from the United States when seeking asylum from Nazi atrocities. More than one-third of them were ultimately murdered on their return to Europe.  We cannot stay silent and allow history to repeat itself.  

We do not invoke the horrors of the past lightly, but these policies evoke the warning signs we learned from survivors - the lessons of how the Holocaust began, how the Nazis came to power, and how dehumanizing words devolved into the worst crimes against humanity.  The stories of detainment - particularly of children unwillingly separated from siblings and parents, of children being taken to “bathe” and then never returned - are reminiscent of the nightmares we know so well. We act today to protect a new generation.  

When children are torn from their parents, the consequences reach far and deep. The president's executive order keeping families together addresses this issue but fails to consider the trauma associated with placing children and adults in detention centers.  Childhood trauma can create negative physical and mental health impacts that last a lifetime — trauma that passes through generations.  The fact that the executive order fails to address a clear plan for reunification of families already separated is unthinkable. Indefinitely incarcerating children seeking asylum is nothing less than child abuse.  We have experienced firsthand the consequences that this abuse can have on individuals and their families, regardless of their age at the time of trauma.

Our families represent the survivors and the victims.  As their descendants, we carry the solemn responsibility to ensure that the trauma and destruction visited on millions of people during the Holocaust because of their religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, citizenship, and political beliefs will never happen again.  We will not allow silence in the face of inhumanity to become a part of our legacy.

We demand that Congress and the Trump administration immediately take action to protect the rights and safety of children and adults seeking asylum.  We call for Congress to develop a clear plan and designate funds explicitly to assist in the immediate reunification of separated families and to provide mental health care to all affected. We stand with these family as individuals and on behalf of the survivors and the victims of Nazi atrocities as we say: Never Again.



Note: Comments submitted may be released as part of a campaign against this policy. They will be attributed in whatever manner you indicate on the form.

Petition by
Caroline Weinberg
New York, New York

To: President Trump, U.S. Attorney Jeff Sessions, U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Kristjen Nielsen, and the United States Congress
From: [Your Name]

We, the undersigned, are Holocaust survivors, their children, their grandchildren, and their great-grandchildren. In the name of our family tragedies, we denounce the indefinite internment of children in detention centers under the zero-tolerance policy. We ask elected and appointed officials to acknowledge the history and consequences of internment camps and enact immigration policies that recognizes the needs of asylum seekers and the rights of children.

The zero-tolerance policy enacted by the current administration violates human rights under the auspices of immigration law. The United States is indefinitely detaining children and their parents seeking refuge. In 1939, almost 900 Jewish refugees were turned away from the United States when seeking asylum from Nazi atrocities. More than one-third of them were ultimately murdered on their return to Europe. We cannot stay silent and allow history to repeat itself.

We do not invoke the horrors of the past lightly, but these policies evoke the warning signs we learned from survivors - the lessons of how the Holocaust began, how the Nazis came to power, and how dehumanizing words devolved into the worst crimes against humanity. The stories of detainment - particularly of children unwillingly separated from siblings and parents, of children being taken to “bathe” and then never returned - are reminiscent of the nightmares we know so well. We act today to protect a new generation.

When children are torn from their parents, the consequences reach far and deep. The president's executive order keeping families together addresses this issue but fails to consider the trauma associated with placing children in detention centers. Childhood trauma can create negative physical and mental health impacts that last a lifetime — trauma that passes through generations. The fact that the executive order fails to address a clear plan for reunification of families already separated is unthinkable. Indefinitely incarcerating children seeking asylum is nothing less than child abuse. We have experienced firsthand the consequences that this abuse can have on individuals and their families.

Our families represent the survivors and the victims. As their descendants, we carry the solemn responsibility to ensure that the trauma and destruction visited on millions of people during the Holocaust because of their religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, citizenship, and political beliefs will never happen again. We will not allow silence in the face of inhumanity to become a part of our legacy.

We demand that Congress and the Trump administration immediately take action to protect the rights and safety of children and adults seeking asylum. We call for Congress to develop a clear plan and designate funds explicitly to assist in the immediate reunification of separated families and to provide mental health care to all affected. We stand with these family as individuals and on behalf of the survivors and the victims of Nazi atrocities as we say: Never Again.