Tell Congress: Remember Ricardo and Stand Up for Worker Safety

Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK) and Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT)

Re: Full Funding for Worker Safety

Ricardo Oliveira, 22, fell to his death at a construction site in Sutton, Massachusetts in January 2016.  He was not safeguarded by a fall protection system and he did not have proper training or equipment from his employer.

To protect workers like Ricardo and thousands of others who die on the job, we need full funding for worker safety.

Please sign the appeal to Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK) and Rep. Rose DeLauro, the chair and ranking minority member of the U.S. House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services. Rep. Cole and Rep. DeLauro will write next year's OSHA budget. We want to make sure that when they do, they remember Ricardo and other fallen workers. No worker should be injured or killed in the course of doing their jobs. Tell Representatives Tom Cole and Rosa DeLauro to make sure workers have the protection they need.

To: Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK) and Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT)
From: [Your Name]

We're asking you to remember Ricardo Oliveira as you write next year's budget for the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and other safety agencies.

Ricardo was just 22 when he fell to his death in January 2016 at a construction site in Sutton, Massachusetts. He was not safeguarded by a fall protection system, and he did not have proper training or equipment from his employer. David White, Ricardo’s father, says his son’s death “could have been easily prevented by training and employer common sense.”

Sadly, too many employers don’t follow safety rules. That’s why 13 U.S. workers die every day – more than 4,800 a year – from tragic workplace incidents like the fall that claimed Ricardo’s life.

With strong safety rules and tough enforcement, we can prevent many of these deaths and make sure workers like Ricardo come home alive to their families.

To protect workers, please ensure full funding for the U.S. OSHA) for FY 2018. This agency, under jurisdiction of your subcommittee, requires a minimum of $573.8 million next year to carry out inspections, enforcement and worker training so we can prevent more tragic deaths in the workplace.

You will cast many votes in Congress this year. When you vote on the OSHA budget, please remember Ricardo Oliveira.