A Panel Discussion About Michael Moore's Planet of the Humans

Start: Saturday, May 23, 2020 7:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time (US & Canada) (GMT-04:00)

End: Saturday, May 23, 2020 8:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time (US & Canada) (GMT-04:00)

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Michael Moore's release of Planet of the Humans was like a bomb set off in the midst of the climate movement. The film was condemned by some and cheered by others. Marcellus Outreach Butler is thrilled to host a panel discussion by three nationally recognized climate activists.

Participants are urged to watch Moore's film beforehand:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zk11vI-7czE

Our Panel

Ted Glick, author and activist, has devoted 51 years of his life to the progressive social change movement. After a year of student activism as a sophomore at Grinnell College in Iowa, he left college in 1969 to work full time against the Vietnam War. As a Selective Service draft resister, he spent 11 months in prison. In 1973 he co-founded the National Committee to Impeach Nixon and worked as a national coordinator on grassroots street actions around the country, keeping the heat on Nixon until his August, 1974 resignation.

Since late 2003 Ted has played a national leadership role in the effort to stabilize our climate and for a renewable energy revolution. He was a co-founder in 2004 of the Climate Crisis Coalition and in 2005 coordinated the USA Join the World effort leading up to December 3rd actions during the United Nations Climate Change conference in Montreal. In May, 2006 he began working with the Chesapeake Climate Action Network and was CCAN National Campaign Coordinator until his retirement in October, 2015. He is currently working as a volunteer with the group Beyond Extreme Energy, which he co-founded in 2014, as well as several groups in New Jersey

Mike Ewall is the founder and director of Energy Justice Network, a national support network for grassroots community groups fighting dirty energy and waste industry facilities such as coal power plants, ethanol plants, natural gas facilities, landfills, and incinerators of every sort. He has been actively involved in student and community environmental justice organizing since high school in 1990. He's taught hundreds of workshops at college campuses and activist conferences throughout the U.S. His grassroots support work has helped many communities achieve victories against power plants, landfills, incinerators, medical waste facilities and other polluting industries.

Patricia M. DeMarco is a native of Pittsburgh, with a doctorate in Biology from the University of Pittsburgh. She has spent a thirty -year career in energy and environmental policy in both private and public sector positions.  She is a Rachel Carson Scholar and served as Executive Director of the Rachel Carson Homestead Association and Director of the Rachel Carson Institute at Chatham University. She holds the office of Vice President of the Forest Hills Borough Council. She sits as Secretary on the Board of Trustees for Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens.

Her  book, titled Pathways to Our Sustainable Future – A Global Perspective from Pittsburgh” explores positive pathways toward sustainability, based on 28 case studies in Pittsburgh. Inspired by Rachel Carson’s environmental ethic, the book was funded by the W. Clyde and Ida Mae Thurman Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation.  It was published by The University of Pittsburgh Press in 2017.



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