Scrap delivery charges and lower minimum spends

To the CEO's of Tesco, Asda, Sainbury's, Morrisons, Iceland, Waitrose and Ocado,

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As millions of people have moved to online deliveries during the lockdowns disabled and older people, and those with long-term health conditions, and families are struggling to make ends meet and pay the week's shopping bill.

Sandip Sodha (pictured above), lead campaigner explains that "many Disabled people cannot get out of the house and shop on the high street and have no choice but to pay supermarket delivery charges. In some cases, people have to make an unenviable choice of heating the home or putting food on the table. Others are being pushed into debt."

In response to a recent Inclusion London survey a participant wrote "Food shopping each week costs far more than buying it from the shops myself and is often so short-dated it has to be used in half a week and then I have to spend more on takeaway" and on top of that is the "extra for home delivery."

Therefore, we are urging supermarkets to scrap supermarket delivery charges and reduce the minimum order to £5. This will make an enormous difference to tens of thousands of disabled people, older people and people with long-term health conditions.

Please take action today and sign and share this petition.



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To: To the CEO's of Tesco, Asda, Sainbury's, Morrisons, Iceland, Waitrose and Ocado,
From: [Your Name]

To the CEO's of Tesco, Asda, Sainbury's, Morrisons, Iceland, Waitrose and Ocado,

As the seven participating supermarkets in the priority slots scheme, and those who provide priority slots through local councils, we are asking you to scrap delivery charges and take steps to reduce minimum spends.

As millions of people have moved to online deliveries during lockdown disabled and older people, people with long-term health conditions and families are struggling to make ends meet and pay the week's shopping bill.
Many cannot get out of the house and shop on the high street and have no choice but to pay supermarket delivery charges. In some cases, people are having to make an unenviable choice of heating the home or putting food on the table and others are being pushed into debt.

"Food shopping each week costs far more than buying it from the shops myself and is often so short-dated it has to be used in half a week and then I have to spend more on takeaway" and on top of that is the "extra for home delivery."

Therefore, we are urging supermarkets to scrap supermarket delivery charges and lower the minimum spend to £5. This will make an enormous difference to tens of thousands of disabled people, older people and people with long-term health conditions.